ENDA

Amalienborg Palace

2010– | Copenhagen, Denmark

Fact Sheet:
Project type: Palace
Built: 2002-2010
Sqm.: 38.000
Client: The Agency for Palaces and Cultural Properties
Type: Conservation and Restoration

The project involves the conservation and restoration of the Royal Danish Palace in Copenhagen, which dates back to 1754. The project was completed for the Agency for Palaces and Cultural Properties. The project includes an in-depth restoration of all structural elements and all surfaces both exterior and interior. Furthermore, the different services, housing, workshops, laundrette etc., within the palaces were updated to meet contemporary standards.
Apart from making the complex of buildings structurally sound, the conservation plan emphasises the importance of restoring the exterior as a collective whole whilst retaining the variations of the individual wings within the complex.

The project is developed by Peder Elgaard, ELGAARD Architecture under the auspices of Erik Møller Arkitekter

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The wings of the complex were in a heavily dilapidated state with numerous cracks resulting in damp, rot and fungal infestations in both the wall and roof construction.
 

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The Royal Danish Palace was erected by Nicolai Eigtved and depicts one of the finest examples of Danish Rococo architecture. The complex consists of four almost identical wings which encompass a polygonal plaza with a centralized equestrian statue of King Frederik V, The founding father of Amalienborg and Frederiksstaden. Amalienborg was originally designed to function as stately residences for the nobilities of the 1750’s Copenhagen. It was laid out on the grounds of the former Sophie Amalienborg Slot, which had burned to the ground in 1689. Following the great fire of Christiansborg Castle in 1794 the palaces were entrusted to the Royal Family and remains as their residence today.
 

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The conservation works have mainly focused on the strengthening of the foundation, facades and roof constructions. The conservation plan strongly emphasizes the importance of restoring the exterior as a collective whole whilst retaining the variations of the individual wings within the complex. Small traces like architectural ironmongery, heightening of the façade, blinded windows were significant elements to restore in order to retain the authenticity and history of the complex.
 

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